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Understanding the Types and Symptoms of Arthritis

Arthritis is the name given to a group of chronic disorders whose symptoms include pain, swelling, and limited range of motion in one or more joints. Arthritis can effect anyone but is most common in older adults. Arthritis may result from trauma, aging, infection, an auto-immune disease, genetics, or occupational injuries. Treatment options for arthritis include medication, exercise, physical therapy, and surgery. Understanding the various types of arthritis and the symptoms that accompany them can help you communicate with your health care professional to find the best treatment.

Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis. It is caused by the wearing away of cartilage around the joint, causing bones in the joint to rub together. Although almost everyone will experience some degree of osteoarthritis after the age of 70, people who work in certain physically demanding jobs or play some sports are more susceptible. Osteoarthritis sufferers often experience stiffness (particularly in the morning) and loss of range of motion in addition to pain that is more severe after physical activity or certain types of movement.

Another  common form of arthritis is rheumatoid arthritis, which is an autoimmune disease in which the body attacks healthy cells. Symptoms are usually experienced in the same joint on both sides of the body. The joints most often affected by rheumatoid arthritis are the fingers, wrists, knees, ankles, and feet. Pain, swelling, and compromised movement are all common in rheumatoid arthritis, as well as eventual deformity of the affected joints in more severe cases. More women than men have rheumatoid arthritis.

Gout is a kind of arthritis that occurs primarily in the joint at the base of the big toe, although it can also occur in the wrists, fingers, knees, and heel. It is cause by excess uric acid in the blood, which is then deposited in joints and surrounding tissues in the form of uric acid crystals. Gout can have various causes, including genetics and trauma, but is often associated with frequent consumption of alcohol and meat. Gout is more prevalent in men than women.

There are many other forms of arthritis, including autoimmune diseases like ankylosing spondylitis and scleroderma, and those resulting from infection, like gonococcal arthritis. Although different types of arthritis can be differentiated on the basis of their symptoms, medical testing is usually necessary to conclusively determine the underlying cause

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Treatments for Hearing Loss

Many Americans, particularly older adults, struggle with hearing loss. It is an extremely common problem in people over 65, and is often the result of a combination of factors. Simple wear-and-tear on the delicate mechanisms of the inner ear over time, in addition to sustained exposure to loud noises, certain medications, and some illnesses, can all contribute to hearing loss.

Hearing loss can be extremely frustrating, as it involves the gradual loss of a sense on which most people have depended throughout their lives. People with hearing loss often find it difficult to follow conversations, and may have to ask others to repeat themselves many times. To people with hearing loss, it may seem as though other people are not speaking clearly. It is frequently difficult for people experiencing hearing loss to hear in environments with lots of ambient noise, such as restaurants and other public places. For these reasons, many people with hearing loss have a tendency to become socially isolated, as trying to interact with others becomes too exasperating. Being unable to hear smoke alarms, verbal warnings, and the sounds of motor vehicles or other potential threats can pose additional risks.

Because of the potential hazards faced by those with hearing loss, as well as its general impact on quality of life, it’s important for people experiencing hearing loss to seek help right away. Hearing aids are a common, and often effective, treatment for hearing loss. A hearing aid is a small device that is placed in the ear and amplifies sound. For people with more profound hearing loss, a tiny electronic device called a cochlear implant is often helpful. This device is implanted in the inner ear by a surgeon, allowing the patient to regain some hearing. Other interventions include assistive listening devices that amplify sounds from the telephone, as well as smart phone and tablet apps, and hearing-loop systems in theaters and other public venues. Finally, the low-tech option of lip-reading is extremely effective for some people who suffer from hearing loss. Special training from a lip-reading coach or teacher can enable people with hearing loss to understand speech and participate in conversations with more comfort and ease.

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Bone-Strengthening Meals for Parkinson’s

Parkinson’s disease is a central nervous system disorder that affects many older adults. Its symptoms include movement problems, such as shaking, difficulty walking, stiffness of the limbs, and stooped posture. In later stages, Parkinson’s can also have psychiatric and behavioral effects, such as depression, dementia, and sleep disturbances. In addition to these common symptoms, bone thinning occurs in some Parkinson’s patients. This is of particular concern since people suffering from Parkinson’s disease are at increased risk for falls that may result in bone fractures or breakages.

In order to slow the progression of bone thinning, it is very important for people with Parkinson’s to eat a nutritious diet rich in nutrients that support bone health. These include minerals like calcium and magnesium, and other nutrients like vitamins D and K. Calcium can be found in dairy products such as milk, yogurt, cheese, and ice cream. Additionally, many of these foods are also fortified with vitamin D. Calcium can also be found in canned, bone-in fish like sardines and salmon; oily fish like salmon, tuna, mackerel, and sardines are a good source of vitamin D. Dark leafy greens like kale, collard greens, spinach, and broccoli are great sources of both calcium and vitamin K, while tomatoes, potatoes, and raisins supply magnesium.

Nutrients for bone health are easy to incorporate into everyday meals. For breakfast, try yogurt with fresh fruit and raisins, or whole-grain cereal with vitamin D fortified milk. For lunch, a grilled cheese sandwich with tomato soup and a spinach salad supplies magnesium, calcium, and vitamin K. For dinner, grilled fish with stir-fried broccoli, mustard greens, or kale, with a side of brown rice and a glass of milk provides magnesium, calcium, and vitamin K. There are plenty of ways to get creative with bone-healthy, nutrient rich foods. Dairy products can easily be incorporated into a wide variety of meals by adding milk to a soup or beverage, yogurt to a sauce or salad dressing, and cheese into a sandwich or casserole. Leafy greens can be used in salads, stir-fries, and gratins, and even blended into shakes and smoothies for an added nutritional boost.

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Tips for Getting a Good Night’s Sleep

For many older adults, sleep troubles rank among the biggest changes that occur with age. Many people who were formerly sound sleepers suddenly experience insomnia, waking during the night, daytime sleepiness, and general disturbances in their sleep patterns. Difficulty getting a good night’s sleep can exacerbate stress, diminish energy, compromise memory, and generally diminish quality of life. However, it’s also a perfectly normal part of aging that most seniors will struggle with at some point.

Changes to the sleep cycle can be attributed to a number of factors. One of these is a change in “sleep architecture,” a term that describes the time spent in different stages of sleep. As people grow older, they tend to spend less time in the deeper stages of sleep, and more in lighter ones. Similarly, many older adults also experience changes in their circadian rhythm, the “biological clock” that governs periods of arousal and sleepiness. Many older people find themselves waking earlier, as well as becoming sleepy earlier in the day. Finally, sleep problems are often related to other medical issues: insomnia, for instance, is a side-effect of some medications. In other instances, diseases like Parkinson’s can cause sleep disturbances.

For someone who wants to remain active and engaged in life, sleep problems can be extremely frustrating: it’s hard to keep work, family, and social obligations when you’re sleep-deprived! There are, however, several ways to improve your sleep and get better rest. Sticking to a routine sleep schedule can help to program your body to fall asleep at the right time. Creating a bedtime ritual that allows you to relax before bed can also be helpful: reading, listening to soft music, taking a warm bath, or other soothing activities are great ways to unwind in the evening. Avoid caffeine and alcohol, especially late in the day, as both substances can disturb sleep. Also, try not to drink too much liquid in the evening: having to get up to go to the bathroom can be very disruptive to sleep.

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Sleep Apnea

Sleep apnea is a common disorder characterized by pauses in breathing during the night. One of the leading causes of snoring, sleep apnea isn’t just annoying – it can have serious health consequences. Obstructive sleep apnea is the most common form of the disorder, and is caused by airway blockage. This type of sleep apnea can affect anyone, although it is more common in overweight individuals. Another type of sleep apnea is central sleep apnea, which is caused by faulty signaling in the part of the brain that controls breathing. Many sleep apnea sufferers have a combination of both kinds.

Sleep apnea is often first detected through snoring, as the bed partners of sleep apnea sufferers are often kept up or wakened by snoring throughout the night. Although snoring in itself is problematic, it’s not the only reason to take sleep apnea seriously: left untreated, sleep apnea can cause or exacerbate heart problems, diabetes, stroke, obesity, high blood pressure, and other ailments.

For older adults, a group among whom insomnia is particularly prevalent, sleep apnea can worsen the condition and further compromise sleep. Because high quality sleep is vital in retaining memory, motor function, coordination, and emotional health, it is especially important for seniors to address insomnia. One of the best ways to insure a good night’s sleep is to treat sleep apnea as soon as it is suspected, as well as exploring the root causes of the condition.

The first line of treatment for sleep apnea usually involves lifestyle changes, such as smoking cessation, weight-loss, and avoiding alcohol, muscle relaxers, and other drugs that may compromise the airway by relaxing the central nervous system. Mechanical treatments, such as special mouth appliances, pillows, and supports, can also be used. If these approaches don’t work, surgical intervention, or the use of special machines that keep the airway open by blowing pressurized air through a face mask, may be indicated.

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With Age Comes Extended Time To Fall Asleep

It is very common for people over the age of 60 to get less than the recommended 7-8 hours of sleep each night. In fact, many older adults struggle with insomnia. Insomnia is defined as difficulty falling and staying asleep – taking longer than 30 minutes to fall asleep or waking frequently during the night.

Sleep changes in older people are due to a number of factors. As people age, the circadian rhythm – the internal cycle often called the “biological clock” – shifts. Many older adults become tired earlier in the evening and wake earlier in the morning than they used to. This can be frustrating, as a new sleep cycle may conflict with social and work schedules. People who are not used to going to bed at an earlier time may have trouble falling asleep, even if they feel sleepy. In addition to changes in circadian rhythm, sleep architecture – the way in which the different stages of sleep are structured – also shifts as people get older. This means that, instead of extended periods of deep, restorative sleep, older people tend to spend more time in lighter stages of sleep, during which they are more susceptible to being woken by changes in the environment, such as noise or light.

In addition to biological changes in sleep architecture and circadian rhythm, older people may experience insomnia due to the ailments that often accompany aging. Chronic pain can make it difficult to fall asleep and stay asleep; diseases such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s can also cause insomnia. Insomnia is also a very common side-effect of certain medications. Although it can be disruptive to daily life, insomnia is a completely normal part of aging. With the right approach, it can be managed to allow maximum quality of life.

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Sleep Apnea Heart Issues

Sleep apnea is a common condition that affects many Americans from all walks of life. Although it is frequently associated with certain populations (it is more prevalent in men, smokers, and overweight individuals, as well as within certain ethnic groups) it can affect anyone. Sleep apnea involves temporary cessation of breathing during sleep, and can range from mild (fewer than five instances every hour) to severe (more than thirty instances within an hour). Although many people associate sleep apnea with insomnia and snoring, when left untreated, it can have even more serious consequences – including an increased risk of heart problems.

Although no causal link between sleep apnea and heart disease has been established, studies have shown a correlation between the disorder and sudden cardiac arrest, arrhythmias, and other heart problems. Researchers have speculated that the changes in oxygen saturation in the blood caused by periodic stoppages in breathing throughout the night interfere with normal electrical patterns in the heart, increasing the risk of dangerous irregularities in rhythm that can lead to heart attack. Similarly, sleep apnea is associated with high blood pressure; periodic waking or changes in the sleep cycle are often accompanied by a spike in blood pressure, due to activation of the sympathetic nervous system. This in turn can put more stress on the heart.

There are other ways in which sleep apnea may be correlated with heart disease. Obesity is a strong risk factor for both sleep apnea and heart disease; addressing obesity may help to combat both problems at once. Although treating sleep apnea may not completely eliminate the risk of sudden cardiac arrest, heart failure, and other heart problems, addressing the disorder is an important step toward better heart health. Detecting and treating sleep apnea as early as possible may help to prevent or ameliorate potentially serious conditions like heart disease.

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The Cause Of Parkinson’s Disease

Parkinson’s disease is a complex disorder that causes problems with movement, as well as psychiatric, skin, urinary, and digestive problems in its later stages.

Parkinson’s is a progressive disease, meaning that it gets worse over time. People who suffer from Parkinson’s initially experience a range of symptoms including tremors, body stiffness, slowness of movement, and impaired balance. At first, these symptoms may be annoying, but pose no impediment to independent living. Eventually, however, symptoms become severe enough to necessitate round-the-clock care for those affected. Although there are many comfort measures that can improve the quality of life for its sufferers, there is no cure for Parkinson’s.

Parkinson’s is a disease of the nervous system, caused by dysfunction in the part of the brain that controls movement. Although most of us take voluntary movement for granted, and can perform a physical task as quickly as we can think about it—scratching our nose, picking up a glass of water, getting up from a chair—for people with Parkinson’s disease, the normal interaction between the parts of the brain that control movement and the rest of the body is interrupted. Ordinarily, when someone initiates movement, a complex interaction between sensory input and parts of the brain responsible for planning and decision-making occurs, and signals are sent to other brain regions responsible for coordination and balance. These signals in turn are transmitted to the cerebellum, the region of the brain responsible for muscle movement, and eventually through the spinal cord to the rest of the body.

The signals that travel through the brain and body must somehow be carried from one place to another: this is accomplished by chemicals called neurotransmitters. These molecules are produced by neurons, highly specialized cells that gather in densely packed nodules on the tips of nerve fibers throughout the brain and nervous system. Neurotransmitters pass between gaps in the neurons, called synapses, and attach to proteins known as receptors on nearby cells. The signal for “movement” is thus passed between neurons until it reaches a receptor site in a muscle, causing the muscle to contract, thereby causing movement. In Parkinson’s disease, this complex interaction between the brain and the rest of the body is interrupted.

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Edison Home Health Care: Consumer Directed Personal Assistance Program

What Is CDPAP?

CDPAP, or the Consumer Directed Personal Assistance Program, is a Medicaid-based program that allows individuals to be in control of their personal home assistant. Unlike other programs, CDPAP allows for the recipient to choose and hire their own health care assistant. The program allows the recipient to feel both in control of their care, as well as feel comfortable with who they choose to hire as their personal assistant.

Who Is Eligible To Become A Personal Assistant?

Almost anyone who is legally allowed to work can become a personal assistant, including members of the recipient’s family. The only relatives who cannot become personal assistants are the recipient’s parents or spouse.

No certificate or license is required to become a personal assistant. The personal assistant must be able to perform custodial and skilled services. These can include cleaning, dispensing medication or insulin shots, and wound care.

Who Administers CDPAP?

While CDPAP focuses on the consumer’s independence, the program is administered through a New York State certified fiscal intermediary. Fiscal intermediaries are private companies that provide payroll for the personal assistant.

How to Enroll

Edison Home Health Care is a NY State certified home care agency that provides CDPAP throughout New York State. Through the agency, the consumer can easily enroll in CDPAP. All the necessary paperwork is given through the agency, and professional assistance is available to help consumers during any part of the CDPAP process.

If you’re interested in enrolling in CDPAP, visit www.edisonhhc.com/cdpap/.

If you want to find out if you are eligible, call the Edison Home Health Care line at 718-489-2955 for a CDPAP specialist.

To learn more about Edison Home Health Care’s involvement in CDPAP, watch the video below.

Arthitis and Occupational Injuries

Arthritis is accompanied by three main symptoms: joint pain, reduced mobility, and swelling of the affected joint. Rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis are the dominate types of arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disorder in which the body mistakenly attacks healthy cells, leading to joint degeneration. Osteoarthritis, on the other hand, is caused by general wear-and-tear on the joint. Osteoarthritis occurs when cartilage – the tough, springy tissue that cushions the bones in a joint – is worn away or compromised. Osteoarthritis is common among older adults since simple aging often causes increased brittleness. Individuals who have a physically demanding occupation, an acute injury, or put repeated stress on a joint can are at a higher risk of developing osteoarthritis.

Physically demanding jobs that require heavy lifting or repetitive motion such as construction workers, dancers, and athletes create extra strain on the joints. Also, retail, hospitality, and healthcare workers who spend much of the day on their feet are at increased risk. Preventive measures for arthritis involve proper stretching before and during activities to ease joints, in addition to taking frequent breaks to rest. Once arthritis has set in, there is no cure for completely getting rid of it, but there are options to ease symptoms. Treatment ranges from lifestyle changes to medications to surgical procedures depending on the severity of the ailment. Regular exercise can strengthen muscles and potentially stimulate cartilage growth. According to the CDC, women can greatly benefit from weight loss to relieve knee osteoarthritis. Diet is essential to health: vitamins C, E, and D are full of antioxidants that can help protect the body. Over-the-counter medications including Tylenol, aspirin, and ibuprofen can relieve pain and reduce inflammation. Other mild forms of osteoarthritis can benefit from massages, acupuncture, physical therapy, ointments, and orthopedic soles. Severe arthritis can be treated with hyaluronic acid injections or joint replacement. Discuss with your physician the best treatment for your condition.

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How to Help Someone with Hearing Loss Understand and Participate in a Conversation

For many individuals, aging is a mixed bag of everyday annoyances, extreme challenges, and wonderful new experiences. While minor and major problems, such as compromised mobility, a change in sleep cycles, or chronic ailments can diminish quality of life for many older individuals, the opportunities afforded by retirement can offset other problems to make this time in life one of great joy. Spending more time with partners and loved ones, watching grandchildren grow up, the opportunity for deeper immersion in hobbies, and the leisure to travel, read, and slow down and enjoy the little things in life can be an absolute delight. In order to enjoy life as much as possible, it’s imperative for seniors to be able to mitigate the not-so-good aspects of aging in order to focus on the good ones.

One of the most common problems experienced by seniors is hearing loss. In fact, everyone begins to lose at least some of their hearing from a very early age. Even people in their twenties hear less acutely than they did as teens! High pitched noises, in particular, become harder for the human ear to detect relatively early on. Most of the time, this isn’t a problem. But after the age of 75, almost half of Americans will have hearing loss that is significant enough to pose a problem in everyday life.

For someone with hearing loss, it can be difficult to understand speech, and thus to follow the flow of a conversation, particularly in places with lots of background noise. This can be extremely discouraging, and, in some cases, lead to social withdrawal due to the frustration of being unable to participate in everyday interactions. For the caregivers, family and loved ones of people with hearing loss, this can be frustrating also. In order to help someone with hearing loss understand and participate in conversation. reducing background noise can be a great way to help. Background noise is a major obstacle to comprehension for people with hearing loss, especially when it comes to picking out consonants. Any time you want to engage in meaningful conversation, or when you want to make someone with hearing loss feel included in a social event, make sure to choose a quiet setting with a low level of ambient noise.

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What are the Early Symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease?

Parkinson’s disease is a progressive degenerative disorder of the nervous system, caused by gradual loss of function in the parts of the brain that control movement. Early symptoms of Parkinson’s disease include tremor of the hands, face, or limbs, stiffness in the arms, legs, and torso, and difficulty initiating voluntary movement. Other early symptoms may include smaller handwriting, stooping or poor posture, and a shuffling walk, and a consistently “serious,” “sad, or angry” facial expression, regardless of the person’s actual mood.

Parkinson’s usually affects people over the age of 50. For most people who develop Parkinson’s, early symptoms are subtle, appear gradually over time, and progress in stages. In some people, however, symptoms progress much more quickly, leading to a more sudden loss of ability.

As the primary symptoms of Parkinson’s become more pronounced, affected individuals often have more difficulty walking, talking, and completing everyday tasks. Walking often becomes problematic as balance, posture, and coordination are compromised, and a characteristic shuffling gait develops, making falls more likely. Talking sometimes becomes difficult for people with Parkinson’s as the disease progresses; many Parkinson’s sufferers speak in a very soft voice, have trouble modulating their tone, and may struggle to find the right words to express themselves. Bathing, dressing, and other activities of daily living become more difficult as coordination deteriorates and voluntary movement gets harder. People with Parkinson’s may experience trouble eating, as a lack of control over the muscles that govern chewing and swallowing make mealtimes more of a challenge.

Because of the progressive nature of Parkinson’s disease, it’s important to stay vigilant at the first onset of symptoms. Although it’s impossible to predict how quickly symptoms will get worse, since disease progress varies from person to person, it’s vital to pursue treatment and coordinate assistance for affected individuals as soon as possible.

Content provided by Edison Home Health Care. Their team of trusted advisors is happy to assist you or any loved one who seek appropriate care for Parkinson problems. Have questions? Give them a call at 888-311-1142, or fill out a contact form.

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Ways to Deal With Hearing Loss

For some, aging is a process that allows them to slow down, contemplate the subtleties of life, and enjoy the fruits of a lifetime of hard work. Retirement may bring opportunities for travel, spending time with family and cultivating new hobbies or returning to old ones. For others, aging can bring cause stress and worry, as health problems appear, money becomes tight, and a loss of independence looms. For many people, it’s a combination of the two. There is one thing that is extremely common as all people age, however: hearing loss. Over time, the delicate mechanisms of the inner ear deteriorate, decreasing sensitivity to sound. This process is so universal that up to a third of people experience hearing loss after the age of 65, and almost half will lose some of their hearing after the age of 75.

For people who experience hearing impairment at an early age, there is plenty of time to adapt. Infants, children, and young people with hearing difficulties often become fluent in sign language and adept at lip-reading and the interpretation of body language. For older adults, however, the loss of a sense that has always been a fundamental part of how they experience the world can be devastating. Individuals with hearing loss may struggle to follow conversations, and have difficulty hearing music or listening over the phone. They may become easily increasingly prone to social withdrawal because of the frustration of being unable to understand others. Over time, hearing loss can lead to depression and relationship problems.

For the friends and loved ones of someone with hearing loss, it can be very difficult to witness these changes. Someone who was formerly lively and vivacious can become solitary and withdrawn. In these situations, it can be very helpful to adjust your communication style, so as to help the person with hearing loss understand and feel included in conversation. Try talking in well-lit areas, and make ample use of facial expressions and gestures to convey your meaning. Even someone who has been able to hear for most of their life will still be able to pick up on the non-verbal aspects of language, and may even develop the ability to lip-read if given the opportunity.

Content provided by Edison Home Health Care. Their team of trusted advisors is happy to assist you or any loved one who seek appropriate care for Parkinson problems. Have questions? Give them a call at 888-311-1142, or fill out a contact form.

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How Does Medication Take Effect on Parkinson’s Patients?

Parkinson’s disease is a chronic condition that is caused by deterioration in regions of the brain that control movement.

Neurons, the densely clustered bundles of nerve cells that send and receive signals in the brain, lose the ability to produce dopamine, a chemical crucial to transmitting messages about movement. Although the exact cause of Parkinson’s is unknown, there are commonalities in the brains of Parkinson’s sufferers that point to the origins of the disease. Abnormal accumulations of protein, known as Lewy bodies, are found on dopamine-producing neurons in the substantia nigra, the brain stem, and other regions of the brain responsible for movement.

Parkinson’s symptoms are typically mild in the beginning, and become worse over time, progressing in stages. Early signs of Parkinson’s include body tremors, which are often initially mild and confined to once side of the body, stiffness, difficulty moving, slow movement, stooped posture, small, cramped handwriting, and a rigid, mask-like facial expression. As the disease progresses, these symptoms become more pronounced, and others develop. In later stages, Parkinson’s symptoms may include psychiatric, digestive, and urinary problems. Every person’s experience of Parkinson’s is unique; some people may struggle with severe tremors, while others may have more trouble with stiffness or slowness of movement.

There is at present no cure for Parkinson’s disease. However, there are treatments available to address its symptoms. A combination of the drugs levodopa and carbidopa is often effective in the treatment of stiffness and slowness of movement. However, these drugs are not especially successful in treating tremors, and may not have any effect on balance or other symptoms. A class of drugs called anticholinergics inhibit the action of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, which is responsible for involuntary movement. These drugs can help to alleviate rigidity and tremors. Ropinirole, bromocriptine, and pramipexole are drugs that mimic dopamine, and stimulate neurons to regulate movement.

Content provided by Edison Home Health Care. Their team of trusted advisors is happy to assist you or any loved one who seek appropriate care for Parkinson problems. Have questions? Give them a call at 888-311-1142, or fill out a contact form.

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How Neurons Connect to the Parkinsons’ Disease

For many people, the ability to move is so basic and intuitive that it’s taken for granted.

While some people face mobility challenges early in life due to disability, injury, or illness, the majority of the population doesn’t give much thought to this important aspect of our lives. From the time we learn to lift our heads, crawl, and grasp objects, movement is integral to the way in we approach life and experience the world. However, although it may seem simple—you don’t have to think about scratching your head, grasping a pen, or reaching out a hand to steady yourself when you trip—movement is in fact a highly complex phenomenon, requiring exquisitely refined communication between the brain and the rest of the body. In certain disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease, this communication is disrupted.

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Content provided by Edison Home Health Care. Their team of trusted advisors is happy to assist you or any loved one who seek appropriate care for Parkinson problems. Have questions? Give them a call at 888-311-1142, or fill out a contact form.

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